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Aatam Hostel at Kota

Miniature

Aatam Hostel has a residential program mix, containing hostels rooms for students along with a residence for the family that owns the plot. Six years in the making, the project is located in the dry and hot climate of Kota, Rajasthan. The town of Kota in Northern India is a coaching hub for training students to take entrance exams to study at the coveted IIT engineering colleges in India. Every year around 200,000 students move to Kota spending a minimum of a year at coaching classes living in private hostels specifically made for student housing in the town.

 

 

 

The economy of the Kota is driven by this temporal population. For the IIT aspirant Kota occupies center stage, so much so, that it spawned a popular OTT show which highlights the travails and tribulations of student aspirants living there. While the coaching centers are as state of the art as any other such educational institute in the country, student housing is neglected and devoid of much thinking. Natural Light, ventilation social spaces are mostly absent. There is a high risk of failure in getting through the IIT exams which when coupled with the severity or lack of sympathetic living spaces can be psychologically oppressive. The Kota hostel is a small beginning in reimagining student living in the town. 

Working with elements of the traditional haveli ( Rajasthan house form) like vertically proportioned courtyards, Jharokhas ( look out balconies) and stone Jali’s ( perforated screens) the project is a remaking of the haveli form suited to the programmatic needs of the students. In stark contrast to the surrounding row house types which together form an impervious wall to the street, the Kota hostel opens up, animating the street with views of the courtyard and then to the playground beyond the plot. The combination of social space of terraces and courtyards creates a wind tunnel enabling breeze to flow through the building. The open to sky courtyard is spanned above by a bridge that connects the two arms of the residential unit for the owners. The building structures through the section multiple stepped erraces of shaded social spaces for the students to creates a visual connect across the other levels as well as with the street and the courtyard. 

Drawings

Images

 

Photography: Suryan//Dang & Kunal Sharma

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Sienna Apartments at Hyderabad

The site for a small apartment building located in the Jubilee Hills checkpost area of Hyderabad city offered vantage views of the city and of the adjoining park. Hyderabad is one of the early movers amongst cities in India that used form based coding to structure the construction of new buildings. The client approached us to work on the building post obtaining municipal approvals for the extent of the building envelope.

While working with approved building envelope extents we re-planned the floor layout so that the two apartment units on each floor were cross-ventilated through terraces and balconies on adjoining faces of each unit.

The second point of intervention was the building skin comprising of walls and horizontal sun protection. Working with master brick masons from Pondicherry, in southern India we designed a wall system made from 9-inch-thick brick walls that corbelled to carry the load of stone faced lintels/chajjas. Glass bay windows are recessed, set in to the openings formed by the corbelled brick work and the cantilevered stone faced lintels.

To ensure the structural integrity of the wall corbelling, wooden templates were designed for the masons to work with. So, while the project is visually defined by these corbelled walls, the systemic potential of the project is from the design of these simple low-tech wooden templates that allow for the corbelling to happen with accuracy. The project through its development of tools and construction processes looks to further the expertise of the craftsman and help in evolving the extent of their craft.

Project Facts
Name: Sienna Apartments

Client: Jagdish & Srinivas Idupuganti
Location: Hyderabad, Telangana, India.
Area: 20,000 sq feet
Year of Completion : 2018
Architects: Sameep Padora & Associates

Design Team: Mythili Shetty, Vami Sheth, Aparna Dhareshwar, Diane Athiade Material:
Brick: Uma Brick Mangalore
Lintel: Sadar Ali Granite
Windows: Technal Windows
Photographs: Vivek Eadara

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JSW Odisha, Township Project

Project Facts –

Client: JSW Cement

Area: for a small township for 600 people in the industrial belt of Jharsuguda Orissa,

Architects: Sameep Padora & Associates

Design Team: Sakshi Gulati, Sadhvi Vanjare, Raj Kachalia, Vami Sheth, Aparna Dhareshwar

Project Description: 

Industrial township housing often referred to as housing colonies, carries with that etymology a typical hierarchical spatial segregation. Choosing to build only in open pockets of a verdant site the built form, articulated at the edge allows us to create a continuous green central community space erasing hierarchies of user groups and class. The site is planned with common programs of the sports facility, market, etc., at the center of the community space. Roads are kept peripheral to enable the entire township as pedestrian and car-free. The landscape strategy retains the verdant forest landscape as a contiguous buffer enveloping the built form while retaining all embedded ecological networks. Check dams on this partially contoured site are planned as a landscape strategy to retain surface runoff recharging groundwater.

The scale of the housing is maintained as G+3 at maximum retaining a connection with the landscape. Load-bearing cyclopean masonry using locally sourced rubble is the primary building block for the project.

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UDAAN-Housing Project at Karjat, Mumbai

Context:

Escalating land prices in Mumbai is forcing out the families that serve the privileged classes. The domestic help, drivers, sweepers, peons etc are the invisible cogs that daily ensure smooth running of the city. Currently they are being dis-housed from their decades old housing, since this has caught the eye of developers; and they are forced to relocate further from their primary sources of income. Currently, this segment forms 50-60 % of the urban population of Mumbai. The commute between home and work thus becomes a critical factor in site selection. If this isn’t handled adequately (eg, the commute is a 2hr+ journey each way), the new homes get rented out and the people return to squat closer to their places of work.

The issue at hand is to provide:

I. well connected

II. low-cost 

III. mass housing

IV. matching growing aspirations 

for the large service sector population. This should also have the capacity to grow incrementally as these new settlements grow in popularity. 

Thus, for site selection, connectivity to public transport networks becomes a critical factor. If such land parcels, which have clear

records, can be identified, procured and ear marked, the entire project can develop in tandem with the MRTS network.

The Solution: 

The solution is multi-pronged-

A. Site- Well connected, adequately sized to upscale

B. Execution/Technology- Precast concrete modules/wet pods serving as structural elements 

But most critically,

C. Design- a modular, but non-repetitive scheme, with a mix of 1 Room Kitchen (RK) and 1 Bedroom Kitchen (BHK), which can be combined to form permutations suiting the fluid requirements of users, with a minimum area of 300sq.ft as mandated.

Community spaces like a ration shop, crèche, a gym, a gathering space that have been built into the design to foster a sense of community.

The Site: 

A 19770 sq.mt plot is within 10 minutes walking distance from Bhivpuri station, Karjat. This is on the Central railway route between Neral and Karjat. It is also connected to NH4 and has road links to both Panvel/Navi Mumbai and Badlapur/Thane.

The FSI for this area is 1.2

The Design: 

The approach explores the flexibility available in clever repetition of a module. The project, being precast pods, can be executed with speed and allows for a number of units that can be configured to suit individual requirements of space for individual families over time.

At the same time, rather than consolidating the 10% amenity into the de-facto club house disconnected from daily use, the design integrated it as a series of dispersed common social programs throughout the building. Since residents would pass by these on a regular day to day basis, the chance of these being maintained well were also much higher.

Being a low-rise building the users experience a closer connection to the ground.

Total BUA proposed: 19080 sq.mt

Total Units proposed (assuming 300 sq.ft): 522

Phase wise allocation:

Phase 1: 255

Phase 2: 267

Unit Design- Many iterations to the 300 sq.ft unit finally led to a module that served the requirements of a low income, yet upwardly mobile family. 

Learning from the research into indigenous housing typologies, for migrant workers in Mumbai, led to four variant designs based on the same grid. Each satisfied the requirements of a particular type of family. 

A. 1 RK

B. 1 BHK

C. Mezzanine Unit

D. Mixed Unit

All the unit types are clubbed together in the same building, allowing a mix of user groups and creating a richer social fabric. All units have an identical width of 3.6mt (approx 12ft) which is generated by the Wet Pod requirements 3.6×1.5m. 

Climatic considerations: 

Based on extensive studies of housing typologies in Mumbai, with its humid climate, the most effective way to ensure comfort conditions is by providing cross ventilation as far as possible. The design addresses this by using the staggered corridors to have cross ventilation through each unit and vertically ventilate the community/corridor areas by staggering the corridors and generating a stack effect cooling through the sloping roof over the circulation zone.  

Scalability:

The idea of scalability works at many levels here. There is already preset 4 typologies that can be selected depending on the current needs of each family, using the same module width of 3.6m

The individual unit is scalable by joining adjacent units when the family scales up in size and economics. The precast building technology ensures that the building phases can be scaled up with minimum disruption to the existing structure.

 

 

Feasibility and Speed of Construction: 

The design is modular. The Wet Pods also act as structural, precast, loadbearing modules between which the slabs are spanned and eliminate the need for extra columns and beams. Since part of the building module is fabricated off-site and simply put into place on site, the actual time taken for construction is much less than a conventional RCC framed one both in terms of time and labour involved. Different techniques of precast technology were explored before settling for the load bearing, precast pod system. Through this method, we are able to build upto G+4 in 21 days as opposed to casting one slab in 21 days using conventional RCC frame construction.

The precast method of construction also has the potential for production at an industrial scale with integrated basic services.

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Mohameddi Park Housing Competition

In this competition, the plots under consideration were separated by a thoroughfare, and the Mosques were to be the anchor points of this community development. After various iterations of grid planning, street development, row house development, etc., we settled upon a mixed cluster development plan.

Climatically, shaded pathways provided maximum benefit to the community as they went through their daily activities, to the mosque and back many times a day and thus became the cornerstone of the mixed cluster development plan.

The peripheral main road or highways led off onto vehicular accesses which were situated at the rear of each plot, and were mostly shaded by an apartment typology that straddled the road. Other accesses were the pedestrian-only streets and green pathways, punctuated by the square and the plaza which were scaled up open areas for community interaction and gathering.

The community facilities and amenities were organised strategically on the junction of inner roads so they would serve clusters well. The Bohri community is known for their community-centric approach, and this was emulated in all aspects of this design – from the street level to the amenities.

The housing typology was a kit of parts with its internal courtyard irrespective of the house size; the main programs were aligned around this core, depending on how the rooms needed to be oriented based on their religious beliefs.

The typical narrow pointed arch was made performative, with the face peeling up to form the base of a balcony in some places, and as a privacy screen in others. The language of the architecture was made identifiable by this module, which found its way in at many different scales.

The sustainability strategy ensured enough grey water recycling to maintain the proposed green cover, which is not usually seen in this weather, but is beneficial nonetheless.

In all, the scheme proposed was responsive to the climate and the community equally.

Drawings – 

Model View –

 

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Lokmanch – Satara Municipal Corporation, Competition entry

Government Institutions were once designed at monumental scales, perhaps to inspire the citizens they were meant to serve. Over time the this resultant impervious, opaque and domineering presence of the institutional building has only served to distance the citizen from the institution.

Our proposal for the Municipal Building of Satara attempts to rework the physical nature & experience of the institution. Imbibing abstracted ideals from the defining features of Satara including the seven hills the Kaas plateau, step well, rajwada and the fort our project is inspired by the setting and context of the city.

Further, we propose to make the building public and to make public spaces for the citizenry. We propose a Lokmanch where the core of our proposal is two public spaces created for the city:

1. A public plaza/resiliency space at the ground, where people can congregate discuss matters of concern even voice their dissent through peaceful congregations. An amphitheatre that is adjacent to non-office programs of the café, museum etc along an axis linking the front street to the wetland landscape behind the building. The amphitheatre along with the wetland landscape itself holds excess water, acting as resilience infrastructure during seasonal flooding as was seen recently.

2. A public garden on the roof with children play areas and walking tracks create a hitherto unseen hybrid public space, which would also allow access to vantage views out into and beyond the currently low-rise city.

Both spaces are connected by an external ramp allowing them to be used by citizens well beyond office hours without compromising the security of the offices.

All official programs lay sandwiched in-between the two public realms thus inverting the default nature of today’s institutions by symbolically putting a public program ‘on top’ instead of the VIP programs used by the Bureaucrat/Politician.

These offices are grouped based on Programmatic adjacencies as sieved from the program and structured around the main hall/plaza and are further interspersed within double-height sitting/waiting areas creating visually connected courts and streets in the air. The stack effect due to the central void of the hall of the people potentially creates naturally ventilated spaces.

The crux of our proposal aims to create an architecture as imagined by our democratic ideals: for the people, by the people, of the people.

Panels:

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UDAAN, low cost mass housing project

 

Escalating land prices in Mumbai is forcing out the families that serve the privileged classes. The domestic help, drivers, sweepers, peons etc are the invisible cogs that daily ensure smooth running of the city. Currently they are being dis-housed from their decades old housing, since this has caught the eye of developers; and they are forced to relocate further from their primary sources of income. Currently, this segment forms 50-60 % of the urban population of Mumbai. The commute between home and work thus becomes a critical factor in site selection. If this isn’t handled adequately (eg, the commute is a 2hr+ journey each way), the new homes get rented out and the people return to squat closer to their places of work.

 

The issue at hand is to provide:

  1. well connected
  2. low-cost
  3. mass housing
  4. matching growing aspirations

for the large service sector population. This should also have the capacity to grow incrementally as these new settlements grow in popularity.

Thus, for site selection, connectivity to public transport networks becomes a critical factor. If such land parcels, which have clear

records, can be identified, procured and ear marked, the entire project can develop in tandem with the MRTS network.

 

 

The Solution:

The solution is multi-pronged-

A. Site- Well connected, adequately sized to upscale

B. Execution/Technology- Precast concrete modules/wet pods serving as structural elements

But most critically,

C. Design- a modular, but non-repetitive scheme, with a mix of 1 Room Kitchen (RK) and 1 Bedroom Kitchen (BHK), which can be combined to form permutations suiting the fluid requirements of users, with a minimum area of 300sq.ft as mandated.

Community spaces like a ration shop, crèche, a gym, a gathering space that have been built into the design to foster a sense of community.

 

 

The Site:

A 19770 sq.mt plot is within 10 minutes walking distance from Bhivpuri station, Karjat. This is on the Central railway route between Neral and Karjat. It is also connected to NH4 and has road links to both Panvel/Navi Mumbai and Badlapur/Thane.

The FSI for this area is 1.2

The Design:

The approach explores the flexibility available in clever repetition of a module. The project, being precast pods, can be executed with speed and allows for a number of units that can be configured to suit individual requirements of space for individual families over time.

At the same time, rather than consolidating the 10% amenity into the de-facto club house disconnected from daily use, the design integrated it as a series of dispersed common social programs throughout the building. Since residents would pass by these on a regular day to day basis, the chance of these being maintained well were also much higher.

Being a low-rise building the users experience a closer connection to the ground.

Total BUA proposed: 19080 sq.mt

Total Units proposed (assuming 300 sq.ft): 522

Phase wise allocation:

Phase 1: 255

Phase 2: 267

 

 

Unit Design– Many iterations to the 300 sq.ft unit finally led to a module that served the requirements of a low income, yet upwardly mobile family.

Learning from the research into indigenous housing typologies, for migrant workers in Mumbai, led to four variant designs based on the same grid. Each satisfied the requirements of a particular type of family.

  1. 1 RK
  2. 1 BHK
  3. Mezzanine Unit
  4. Mixed Unit

All the unit types are clubbed together in the same building, allowing a mix of user groups and creating a richer social fabric. All units have an identical width of 3.6mt (approx 12ft) which is generated by the Wet Pod requirements 3.6×1.5m.

Climatic considerations:

Based on extensive studies of housing typologies in Mumbai, with its humid climate, the most effective way to ensure comfort conditions is by providing cross ventilation as far as possible. The design addresses this by using the staggered corridors to have cross ventilation through each unit and vertically ventilate the community/corridor areas by staggering the corridors and generating a stack effect cooling through the sloping roof over the circulation zone.

Scalability:

The idea of scalability works at many levels here. There is already preset 4 typologies that can be selected depending on the current needs of each family, using the same module width of 3.6m

The individual unit is scalable by joining adjacent units when the family scales up in size and economics. The precast building technology ensures that the building phases can be scaled up with minimum disruption to the existing structure.

Feasibility and Speed of Construction:

The design is modular. The Wet Pods also act as structural, precast, loadbearing modules between which the slabs are spanned and eliminate the need for extra columns and beams. Since part of the building module is fabricated off-site and simply put into place on site, the actual time taken for construction is much less than a conventional RCC framed one both in terms of time and labour involved. Different techniques of precast technology were explored before settling for the load bearing, precast pod system. Through this method, we are able to build upto G+4 in 21 days as opposed to casting one slab in 21 days using conventional RCC frame construction.

The precast method of construction also has the potential for production at an industrial scale with integrated basic services.

 

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Galeecha Pavilion ’09

Project Facts –

Project: Galeecha Pavilion ’09
Location: Mumbai
Status: Built
Area:111 Sq.Mt.
Design Team:Shashank Srivastava


Sustainable Processes A temporary structure measuring 20 meters by 6 meters designed for an exhibitor in a trade show was designed to be 100% recyclable in sharp contrast to the usual wasteful nature of such typologies. The pavilion consisted of 110 industrially die cut and laser-cut corrugated cardboard members in a parametrically designed slotted system ensuring that members perpendicular to each other at intersections locked- in enabling a rigid grid that has inherent structural capacities. Post the exhibition the cardboard was recycled by the manufacturer.

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KJ Somaiya College For Information Technology.

Project Facts

Project: KJ Somaiya College For Information Technology.
Location: Sion, Maharashtra.
Area:2070 Sq.Mt.
Status: Built
Design Team: Subham Pani, Aparna Dhareshwar, Nikita Khatwani, Sandeep Patwa


The IT College building is an addition to the K.J. Somaiya Institute of Engineering on their Sion campus in Northern Mumbai. The site for the new building was flanked on one end by a cement plant, on another by a contaminated rivulet, and the west by the existing 8 stories engineering college building. The client brief was for the new institute to accommodate programs that included Workshops, Laboratories, Lecture Rooms Student Community Rooms along with an extension to the existing cafeteria in the adjoining building, to be built in a second phase. Raising the building on a high plinth to protect against flooding in the monsoons, each of the programs is located based on programmatic adjacencies and around two courtyards. A veranda-like circulation space around the courtyard doubles as an activity spine linking all the study rooms and creating opportunities for students to learn through chance meetings and interaction with each other. The courtyard facing walls of all programs are designed with openings to allow a visual connection with other students in the courtyards, veranda, and the classrooms clustered around the court. Hence, even when in their respective spaces, the students feel as if they are in a collective learning environment without walls separating them. The Workshops, Laboratories, Lectures, and Community rooms are designed without any shared walls to create vistas outwards between each program, reduce any noise transfer from one room to the next, and allow air circulation around the rooms keeping them cooler. The insulated roof plane spans overall programs linking them together into a distinct singular building while folding into giant water gargoyles that would channel rainwater into the courtyards and further into harvesting tanks.

Drawings –


 

 

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Goel Ganga School Competition.

Project Facts –

Project: Goel Ganga School Competition.
Location: Pune, Maharashtra, India.
Year: 2016
Design Team: Sameep Padora, Saloni Parekh, Samidha Kowli, Kriti Veerappan, Saurabh Suryan, Sandeep Patwa, Aniket Umaria, Subham Pani, Anthea Fernandes, Diane Athaide, Ruturaj Panchal.

 


The competition brief for the GG School in Pune, required for 3 separate schools to be located on a single site. Our solution looks to leverage the sum of their individual common programs of library, labs etc. onto a ground floor collective campus, a 9 meter high space of enclosed programs clustered around streets and courtyards. This becomes the nucleus of the project from which three, two story clusters are structured around courtyards and stacked vertically to fulfill square footage while maintaining an intimate scale for the classrooms.